30 Scary Password Statistics that Concern Us All in 2023

Scary Password Statistics & Facts

  • 40% of Americans have had their personal data compromised online. Out of those 47% also lost money as a result.
  • 51% of users struggle with managing multiple passcodes and using the same work and personal passwords.
  • An average of 52% of data breaches were caused by malicious attacks, and each breach costs $4.27 million on average.
  • 32% of users store passwords in browsers, 26% in spreadsheets.
  • When it comes to work passwords, 66% of computer users know that it is essential to secure them and 63% feel the need to secure their personal ones.
  • When people are in need of a unique password, 3 out of 4 people change only one letter to a character.
  • More than 29% of mobile-device users never lock their gadgets because they find reentering passwords to be tedious.
  • Overall 45% of Americans have changed their password after being hacked.
  • Only 31.3% of internet users update their passwords on a monthly or yearly basis.
  • Nearly 60% of Americans have used a name or date of birth as part of their password for online accounts.
  • Overall 76% of the youngest generation are not mindful of their password security.
  • 69% of employees share their passwords with colleagues.
  • 78% of Generation Z (16-24 year old) users use the same password for various online accounts.
  • 57% of people who have been the victim of a phishing attack have not changed their passwords, which means they are still at risk.
  • A study of more than 15 billion passwords reveals that the average password is eight characters or less.
  • It’s a common concern that 90% of internet users are worried about their passwords getting hacked.
  • Large organizations are more likely to use MFA – 87% of businesses with 10,000 or more employees use it.
  • Biometric authentication technology is used by 62% of businesses.
  • In America, 41.4% of companies use up to 25 apps at a time that each require individual passwords.
  • Research has shown that only 15% of IT administrators enforce the use of two-factor authentication.
  • 95% of employees using multifactor authentication operate on a software-based option.
  • Denmark leads the world in multifactor authentication, with a wide margin over the United States and Germany.
  • A study found that 55% of consumers feel businesses need to provide account security while 72% would like more security than just a password.
  • 37% of internet users try to reset their password at least once a month due to forgetfulness.
  • One in four Americans admits to using one of the easy-to-crack passwords like “123456” or “qwerty.”
  • There is a disturbing statistic that states 67% of IT security practitioners do not use any form of two-factor authentication in their personal lives and 55% do not use it at work.
  • 75% of Americans are frustrated with passwords, and some of them can’t remember their own password.
  • Only 24% of people use a password manager to protect themselves.
  • MFA is used by 33% of employees in the education industry and 32% of bankers or financial professionals.
  • More than 50% of users know what password managers and 2FA are.

How safe are you online? Are you still using the same passwords you were a few years ago? If so, it might be time for a change. Believe it or not, passwords are only going to become more important in the years to come.

With cybercrime on the rise, it’s more important than ever to make sure your information is kept safe. Check out our top password statistics for 2023 and find out how to protect yourself from hackers. Read On!

General Password Statistics in 2023

1. 51% of users struggle with managing multiple passcodes and using the same work and personal passwords.

(Source: First Contact)

It’s always important to make sure you are protecting your personal information, but it is even more difficult when the same password that you use for work logins is also used for your personal accounts.

A recent study found that 51% of people use the same passwords across both their work and personal accounts. This means that if a hacker were to breach one account, they could access all of your private information in an instant. That’s why it’s so important to create different passwords for each account you have.

2. 40% of Americans have had their personal data compromised online. Out of those 47% also lost money as a result.

(Source: Insurance Information Institute)

With increased privacy breaches, it’s not a surprise that almost half of Americans have had their personal data compromised online. Out of that 47% who lost money as a result, 40% of US adults have been the victim of credit card theft. This has severe consequences on people’s financial security, impacting their ability to buy food and pay rent.

This is why it’s important to be aware when browsing the internet. It’s also important to protect yourself by using complex passwords and updating all of your passwords at least once a month. If you notice any strange activity on your social media accounts, change passwords right away and keep an eye out for suspicious emails in the future.

3. An average of 52% of data breaches were caused by malicious attacks, and each breach costs $4.27 million on average.

(Source: NorthWestern University & IBM)

In today’s world, data breaches are commonplace. Every day, there is a new security breach and every day more personal data is leaked. According to IBM’s 2021 Cyber Security Intelligence Index report, in 2023 there were 918 reported incidents of advanced persistent threats that were identified by the company. 

A malicious attack can take many forms, from hacking into a system to staging a physical theft of data. The effects stretch far beyond just the scope of one person or organization. In fact, 52% of data breaches in 2023 were caused by malicious attacks. So it’s very important to keep your personal information safe and secure while browsing the internet.

4. 32% of users store passwords in browsers, 26% in spreadsheets.

(Source: DataProt)

Every day, millions of people are being hacked. From our emails to our social media profiles, even the most private information is being accessed and sold. The fear of having our personal data compromised has led many of us to take extreme measures in order to protect ourselves from the risk of hackers.

But what about the password you use for your email account? It’s shocking how vulnerable we are when it comes to passwords. Of those surveyed, 26% said they stored them in a spreadsheet and 32% stored them in their browser window. We have no idea how much time these hackers spend trying out different passwords until they find one that actually works, but there is an increasing number of insane hacks each year that show just how easy it can be.

If you’re not keeping track of your passwords or using a secure password manager, then you could be putting all of your personal information at risk.

5. When it comes to work passwords, 66% of computer users know that it is essential to secure them and 63% feel the need to secure their personal ones.

(Source: Ponemon Institute)

With the number of hacks that have been reported lately, cybersecurity is a major concern for computer users. A recent survey found that 66% of computer users think it is essential to protect work passwords, and 63% feel the same way about passwords used on personal devices.

These numbers are especially high considering 75% of respondents said they don’t know how to create secure passwords in the first place. “Password” was the most common word entry in a password field by respondents. So it’s time to start taking your password security more seriously.

6. When people are in need of a unique password, 3 out of 4 people change only one letter to a character.

(Source: Business Insider)

Have you ever given up on the hunt for a secure password and just used something that was easy to remember? You are not alone, it seems. A recent study found that when people have to come up with a unique password, 3 out of 4 people change only one letter to an unintelligible character. Why do they do this? 

The study found that users often feel lost when they are trying to come up with passwords that are difficult to guess. To create something new, they make minor adjustments to an existing password, like changing one letter or adding a number at the end. But this may not be enough for your accounts because hackers can easily hack into accounts by looking for simple changes in passwords.

7. More than 29% of mobile-device users never lock their gadgets because they find reentering passwords to be tedious.

(Source: Pew Research Center)

Worrying about your phone getting stolen or losing it is a significant concern for many people. But if you’re not using a password to lock your phone, then you’re really not doing anything to protect it.

These are the findings of a survey done by mobile security company Lookout. The results found that more than 29% of mobile-device users never lock their gadgets because they find re-entering passwords to be tedious. And about 68% never use any form of security on their devices. So take your personal information security more seriously.

8. Overall 45% of Americans have changed their password after being hacked.

(Source: Comparitech)

Have you ever been hacked? If so, you’re not alone. A recent study shows that 45% of Americans have changed their passwords after being hacked. The study also found that 75% of Americans believe the responsibility for online security should fall on the company or company website they are using, rather than on them.

It will take some time for people to learn how to properly secure their online data and passwords. We are all learning as we go here. The best thing to do is to be proactive in changing your passwords and putting protections in place as soon as possible.

9. Only 31.3% of internet users update their passwords on a monthly or yearly basis.

(Source: Digital Guardian)

Passwords are an important tool in protecting your online security. They allow you to keep your online data, such as your email and social media accounts, safe. So what happens if you don’t update your passwords on a monthly or yearly basis? 

A new study found that only 31.3% of internet users update their passwords on a monthly or yearly basis. This may be due to the hassle of remembering a different password every time you log in to a new website (and also forgetting them).

Password Security Statistics

10. Nearly 60% of Americans have used a name or date of birth as part of their password for online accounts.

(Source: Hosting Tribunal)

There are many reasons why people use names or dates of birth as passwords for their online accounts. Some people create passwords that are easy to remember, so they do not have to try and remember a complicated password. Others use their name or date of birth for security purposes. 

What’s interesting is that about 60% of Americans have used a name or date of birth as part of their password for an internet account. If you want to create a strong password, it is important to come up with one that is complex and difficult to guess. You need to make sure that the password will not be found in any list of popular passwords.

11. Overall 76% of the youngest generation are not mindful of their password security.

(Source: Digital Guardian)

The digital age has brought with it a new level of security, but we’re not paying attention to it. As technology becomes more advanced, so does the need for security. With hackers becoming smarter and more cunning, how can we protect ourselves?

We know that passwords are important for our online safety, but many of us don’t take them seriously enough. In fact, 76% of the young generation don’t pay attention to password security. This is worrying because it means that almost three-quarters of young people are putting themselves at risk every day.

12. 69% of employees share their passwords with colleagues.

(Source: Dashlane)

It’s common knowledge that you should keep your passwords safe and not share them with coworkers. However, it seems that the majority of employees around the world are guilty of this practice. 

According to a recent study conducted by Dashlane, 69% of respondents have shared their passwords with colleagues at work at one point or another. Unfortunately, many people don’t realize the risks that come with sharing your password. For instance, it can lead to identity theft and data breaches.

This is because when you share your login information with someone else, you’re giving them access to all of your private information. So if they get hacked or there’s any sort of breach in security, your account will also be compromised and exposed to risk. If you’re thinking about letting a coworker use your account for any reason, think again!

13. 78% of Generation Z (16-24 year old) users use the same password for various online accounts.

(Source: Fast Company)

Keeping your personal information safe is becoming more and more difficult. With the rise in cyber-security breaches, it’s vital to be diligent and keep your personal information as secure as possible. 

However, most people are not educated on how to protect themselves and their passwords often end up being the same for multiple accounts. Generation Z users are the most vulnerable with 78% of them using the same password for various accounts. This can result in a breach that affects all of their online accounts at once.

14. 57% of people who have been the victim of a phishing attack have not changed their passwords, which means they are still at risk.

(Source: First Contact)

Phishing attacks are an ongoing problem, but the latest findings from a survey conducted by First Contact show that their success rate is alarming. Phishing attacks are often carried out through emails that appear to come from sources that you know or trust. 

These fake emails attempt to get your personal information by tricking you into clicking on links or providing your login credentials. The study found that 57% of people who have been the victim of a phishing attack have not changed their passwords, which means they are still at risk.

It’s important to take precautions against this type of attack, such as changing our passwords every once in a while and double-checking to make sure we’re responding to an email from the right source.

15. A study of more than 15 billion passwords reveals that the average password is eight characters or less.

(Source: SafeAtLast)

The majority of passwords people use are easy to guess. According to a new study, researchers analyzed more than 15 billion passwords and found the average password length is eight characters or less, and the most popular word in passwords is “password.” 

The findings should be troubling to anyone who’s had their personal information hacked or leaked. The majority of passwords we use are easy to figure out, and as technology improves it will only get easier for hackers to break into our accounts.

16. It’s a common concern that 90% of internet users are worried about their passwords getting hacked.

(Source: Hosting Tribunal)

In the modern world, you need your password to be an unbreakable fortress. It’s a common concern that 90% of internet users are worried about their passwords getting hacked. But do you know what is even more worrisome? 

The number of people who use the same password for everything. It can be difficult to create a unique and secure password for every site and service you use, but it’s essential that you do so. The best solution is a password manager, which will help you create complex passwords and remember them all.

Business Password Statistics

17. Large organizations are more likely to use MFA – 87% of businesses with 10,000 or more employees use it.

(Source: TechRepublic)

It’s no secret that businesses are more likely to use multi-factor authentication (MFA) than individual users. After all, the safety of business data is of utmost importance. In fact, a recent study showed that 87% of businesses with 10,000 employees or more use MFA. 

That’s great news, because the more businesses that use MFA, the more secure our data will be. If you’re in charge of your company’s IT security, be sure to recommend MFA to your colleagues and managers. It’s an easy way to keep your data safe and your business running smoothly.

18. Biometric authentication technology is used by 62% of businesses.

(Source: IBIA)

Biometric authentication technology has become popular with many businesses. In fact, a recent survey by the International Biometrics & Identification Association (IBIA) found that 62% of organizations are using biometric authentication technology. A biometric system can help companies save time and money by reducing fraud, lost wallets, and turnover rates.

As more customers become comfortable with biometric authentication technology, it can be used to replace physical identification cards and passwords in ways that are more convenient for people. It also lets companies verify their employees to gain higher levels of security and reduce the risk of fraud.

19. In America, 41.4% of companies use up to 25 apps at a time that each require individual passwords.

(Source: DataProt)

Do you use a different password for every website you visit? It’s time to simplify things. The number of passwords a person needs to remember is directly proportional to the number of websites they visit.

According to a study, 41.4% of companies use up to 25 apps that each require individual passwords. This can be a burden for employees and employers alike. Some companies have come up with creative ways to help their employees deal with the time-consuming task of logging into apps on a daily basis.

20. Research has shown that only 15% of IT administrators enforce the use of two-factor authentication.

(Source: LastPass)

Keeping your data safe from prying eyes is the most important thing to do. But, despite security efforts from organizations and the government, hackers are always coming up with new ways to get past any defences that have been built up to date. Two-factor authentication (2FA or 2-step verification) is an extra layer of protection for your accounts and data.

It ensures that only you can access your account with a second step as an added protection against fraud and is now available on more than one billion online services. But, research has shown that only 15% of IT administrators enforce the use of two-factor authentication. That’s why more hackers become active and steal all the data of many organizations.

21. 95% of employees using multifactor authentication operate on a software-based option.

(Source: Security Magazine)

Security is a top priority for everyone, but many people don’t have the knowledge necessary to keep themselves safe. It can be difficult to make sense of the myriad precautions that need to be taken in order to stay secure. Multifactor authentication is key to protecting your business and personal information. A recent study found that 95% of employees using multifactor authentication operate on a software-based option.

There are many different methods of multifactor authentication, so it’s important to explore what will work best for you and your business before making a choice. Whether you decide on a software-based or hardware-based option, you should feel confident in knowing that most security experts agree that you’re making an informed decision by adding this extra layer of protection.

22. Denmark leads the world in multifactor authentication, with a wide margin over the United States and Germany.

(Source: Infosecurity Europe)

A new study by Infosecurity Europe has found that Denmark is the world leader in the use of multifactor authentication. Denmark has adopted a national strategy to promote increased use of multifactor authentication as a single identifier. This is in contrast to the United States and Germany that have not adopted such a strategy. The Danish government has invested heavily in educating industry and citizens on the benefits of multifactor authentication.

The government understands that this is an investment in security, rather than a cost. With its recent success, Denmark has developed more trust with its citizens while simultaneously building confidence on the global stage. Denmark can lead the way for other countries by raising awareness about multifactor authentication and teaching others how it works.

23. A study found that 55% of consumers feel businesses need to provide account security while 72% would like more security than just a password.

(Source: DataProt)

Account security is a hot topic these days. With many hacks and data breaches in the news, it’s no wonder people are worried about their safety online. A study found that 55% of consumers feel that businesses need to provide account security and 72% want more than just a password. It’s important for businesses to focus on account security. Protecting your customer’s personal data is essential in the digital age.

You can do this by building a strong foundation of protection at the beginning, rather than amending a few security measures after something goes wrong. One example of this is using a password manager to generate unique passwords for each individual with access to their account.

Password Trends

24. 37% of internet users try to reset their password at least once a month due to forgetfulness.

(Source: SplashData)

A whopping 37% of internet users try to reset their password at least once a month due to forgetfulness. This can be really frustrating, especially if you have to remember a lot of different passwords. Usually, people just choose the same password over and over again, which is a major security risk.

To avoid this, use a password manager to keep track of all your passwords. This will help you come up with strong passwords and keep them safe. You can also try using a two-factor authentication system. This is an extra layer of security that requires more than just your password usually something like a unique code that’s sent to your phone. Keep these statistics in mind when creating your next password!

25. One in four Americans admits to using one of the easy-to-crack passwords like “123456” or “qwerty.”

(Source: Cyber News)

It’s easy to forget to update your passwords. After all, it only takes a few minutes of time and doesn’t seem like a big deal. But what if you’re not the only one with that password? What if someone else has access to your account because they know your password? In reality, it’s not hard for hackers and cybercriminals to figure out passwords. 

A recent study found that 1 in 4 Americans admits to using one of the easy-to-crack passwords like “123456,” “password,” and “qwerty.” They might not be very creative, but hackers know them too well. So it’s important to keep your information safe by choosing strong passwords that are different for every site and changing them regularly.

26. There is a disturbing statistic that states 67% of IT security practitioners do not use any form of two-factor authentication in their personal lives and 55% do not use it at work.

(Source: Provision Technologies)

The demand for two-factor authentication continues to grow. Companies and organizations are recognizing the need for protection for their most critical assets, employees, and customers and are investing in two-factor authentication technologies to ensure their access is controlled and monitored. But a survey found that 67% of IT security practitioners do not use any form of two-factor authentication in their personal lives and 55% do not use it at work.

Using 2FA mitigates the risk of unauthorized access to sensitive information, hacking and phishing attacks, and other threats. The use of 2FA can change the dynamic of your organization’s security posture by giving you the ability to have greater visibility into the activities of your staff. This also increases your ability to protect sensitive information.

27. 75% of Americans are frustrated with passwords, and some of them can’t remember their own password.

(Source: SplashData)

In a survey of 5,000 people conducted by SplashData, 75% of Americans admitted to being frustrated with passwords. While most respondents said they had trouble remembering their passwords, they also reported forgetting four or more passwords in the past year.

It is because of your mistake that hackers steal all your personal information. So the best solution is a password manager, which will help you create complex passwords and remember them all.

28. Only 24% of people use a password manager to protect themselves.

(Source: Comparitech)

Despite the increasing number of data breaches, many people still don’t take the necessary precautions to protect their information. For example, a recent study found that only 24% of people use a password manager to create and store strong passwords. 

This is a concerning statistic, as password managers are one of the most effective ways to create and manage strong passwords. Other measures such as two-factor authentication and changing passwords regularly are also important, but a password manager is one of the most effective ways to keep your information safe.

29. MFA is used by 33% of employees in the education industry and 32% of bankers or financial professionals.

(Source: Security Magazine)

According to the latest report by Security Magazine, MFA continues to be the strongest form of authentication. MFA, also known as multi-factor authentication, is a security process that requires two forms of identification for logging in. 

The first is your usual username and password, and the second is a one-time code that is either sent to your phone or generated by an app. Out of all the industries studied in the report, MFA was most commonly used by employees in the education industry (33%) and bankers or financial professionals (32%).

30. More than 50% of users know what password managers and 2FA are.

(Source: Comparitech)

Password managers and two-factor authentication are becoming increasingly popular as people become more aware of the importance of online security. A recent study showed that more than 50% of users are now familiar with password managers, and almost 25% are using them. 

Two-factor authentication is also gaining traction, with 15% of users reporting that they are using it. As awareness of online security threats increases, we can expect these numbers to continue to rise in the coming years.

Conclusion

As we move further into the digital era, it’s more important than ever to make sure our passwords are secure. However, many people are still not using adequate security measures to protect their online information. 

These password statistics show that we need to be doing more to keep our data safe. By 2022, it’s crucial that we all start using password managers and two-factor authentication to keep our information protected.

Sources

First ContactInsurance Information InstituteNorthwestern UniversityIBM
DataProtPonemon InstituteBusiness InsiderPew Research Center
ComparitechDigital GuardianHosting TribunalDigital Guardian
DashlaneFast CompanyFirst ContactSafeAtLast
Hosting TribunalTechRepublicIBIALastPass
Infosecurity EuropeSecurity MagazineDataProtSplashData
Cyber NewsProvision TechnologiesSplashDataSecurity Magazine

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